Act of Terror in Mississippi

Bruna Bouhid Press Releases

ICE Agents Abduct 680 Just Days After Massacre Targeting Latinx and Immigrant Families

For Immediate Release Contact: Sheridan Aguirre | sheridan@unitedwedream.org | 202.793.2267

Washington, D.C. – Today, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agents took over a small Mississippi community to arrest 680 mostly Latinx workers. According to reports, this is the largest workplace raid in a decade.

United We Dream redoubled its efforts to share it’s community protection App Notifica, available for free download at the iTunes and Google Play stores as well as resources such as our Know Your Power guide and If You See ICE – a guide for U.S. citizens who witness an ICE arrest. 

Greisa Martinez Rosas, Deputy Executive Director of United We Dream, said:

“We’re calling these ICE raids for what they are – an act of terror.

Just days after the El Paso massacre where a gun wielding maniac parroted Trump’s anti-immigrant hate, a battalion of ICE agents abducted 680 Latinx and immigrant men and women on Trump’s orders.

For anyone who tries to desensitize the situation or blur the connections between the acts of terror this week I call bullshit.

Latinx and immigrant kids and families have been terrorized this week. The effect of ripping children from their parents at the border or stealing parents away from their children in Mississippi is the same. We are people going about our lives, working to support our families or going to school at risk.

It is time for both parties in Congress to stop giving ICE and CBP billions of dollars and to hold them accountable. ICE and CBP are the armed, taxpayer funded extension of Trump’s anti-immigrant hate and must be stopped. 

Immigrant youth of United We Dream call on all people of principle to visit www.CloseTheCamps.us to stop the deportation force in your community.”

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United We Dream is the largest immigrant youth-led organization in the nation, a powerful network made up of over 400,000 members and 48 affiliate organizations across 26 states. UWD’s vision is to build a multi-racial, multi-ethnic movement of young people who organize and advocate at the local and national levels for the dignity and justice of immigrants and communities of color in the United States.