Immigrant Youth & Allies Rally at Dallas Office of Rep. Pete Sessions (R-TX) for Clean Dream Act by December


Widespread Events Across Texas and Nation This Week Alone Calling For a Clean Dream Act

For Immediate Release
October 19, 2017
Chris Valdez | chris@unitedwedream.org | 713-352-8197

Dallas, TX – Yesterday, immigrant youth leaders and allies with United We Dream, Indivisible Richardson, and MoveOn.org from TX-32 took to the streets outside the office of US Rep. Pete Sessions to share their stories, commitment, and demands for a clean Dream Act by December of this year.

The action follows Trump’s decision to kill DACA one month ago – a program that offered safety from deportation and the ability to work for more than 800,000 undocumented youth across the country, and an estimated 124,000 young Texans.

Texas is the frontline of anti-immigrant activity with increasing ICE raids and a growing number of immigrant detention camps. Texans face the possible full implementation of racial profiling law SB 4, a law that puts those formerly protected under DACA at immediate risk for deportation and family separation by turning city and campus law enforcement into immigrant deportation agents.

Photos from the event can be found here, here, here, here, and here.

Giovanny Torres, Dallas area resident, DACA beneficiary, and leader with Mavericks United said: “As a student at the University of Texas at Arlington who is invested and engaged in my community I’m all too aware of the urgency behind Congress passing a clean Dream Act by December. Young people like me in my community have DACA permits that will expire next year, ending our careers, and robbing us of the peace we had knowing that we were not under threat of deportation and that our academic achievements could be realized in our job choice, allowing us to provide for ourselves and our families.

If members of Congress do not pass a clean Dream Act – this is all in jeopardy. Sadly, in my home state of Texas family values seem to only apply to families that don’t look like mine. We know what is moral and right, and I continue to fight for our immigrant community against racist laws like SB 4 and programs like 287g, so that our immigrant community can one day live without the fear that their family could be torn apart, simply because they choose to attend school, pursue a career, or work to provide for their families.”

Ana-Maria Ramos, co-founder Indivisible Richardson, TX-32 resident, said: “People in Dallas are terrified of what will happen if a Dream Act is not passed by December. As a professor, attorney, and as an aunt, I see the impact that Trump’s decision to kill DACA has had on my students, fellow educators, neighbors, and my nephew. When DACA was first implemented, I helped process some of the initial applications, and today some of these families have come to me concerned for their safety knowing that the current administration is holding their deeply personal information. If a Dream Act is not passed now, life is stopping for thousands of people in the Dallas area including that of My nephew, and fellow educators who had to stop teaching because their renewals did not go through in time. Everyone in this city will continue feeling the impact in our schools, churches, and kitchen tables. Trump is spreading an insidious poison that is affecting every corner of our community.

If Pete Sessions will not stand up for the immigrant children and families of our community, schools, and churches, he is cementing a terrible legacy for his children and grandchildren. The message he is sending with his silence is that he is okay being on the wrong side in a very dark part of American history. To Pete Sessions, from his constituents, we continue to say: Commit to pass a clean Dream Act by December!”

###
United We Dream is the largest immigrant youth-led organization in the nation, a powerful nonpartisan network made up of 55 local groups in 26 states. UWD organizes and advocates for the dignity and fair treatment of immigrant youth and families, regardless of immigration status. We seek to address the inequities and obstacles faced by immigrant youth and believe that by empowering immigrant youth, we can advance the cause of the entire community—justice for all immigrants. You can find more about UWD online at www.unitedwedream.org