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For Immediate Release

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UWD Staff

President Biden Must Immediately Grant Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for Cameroon

Contact: Anabel Mendoza| anabel@unitedwedream.org | 773-232-0790

Washington, D.C. – Despite ongoing anti-Black and anti-immigrant violence, the Biden administration has failed to grant TPS for Cameroonians seeking asylum in the U.S. and instead has continued  to rapidly deport and expel migrants through the use of anti-Black policies like Title 42. To date, over 1.8 million people have been deported or expelled since President Biden took office. Last week, Human Rights Watch issued a report documenting that Cameroonians deported from the United States were tortured, physically or sexually abused, or assaulted by state agents and were detained in detention facilities for periods ranging from days to months. 

Juliana Macedo do Nascimento, Senior Advocacy Manager of United We Dream, said:

“Mounting evidence and calls from immigrant rights advocates across the country continue to shed light on the human rights violations and persecution Cameroonians who have been recently deported from the United States continue to suffer. Since 2014, thousands of Cameroonians have sought their right to asylum in the U.S. after facing ongoing conflict in Cameroon. 

Despite this, the Biden administration has failed to provide safety and security by designating TPS for Cameroon. There should be no hesitation in ensuring that families are able to stay together and that those who seek their human right to asylum have the ability to do so without being subjected to further cruelty and harm from the anti-Black deportation forces of ICE and CBP. To truly protect immigrant communities, President Biden must root out anti-Blackness across U.S. immigration policy, from ending Title 42 which has resulted in the expulsion of thousands of Haitian migrants to ensuring that TPS is immediately extended to predominantly-Black countries like Cameroon.” 

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United We Dream is the largest immigrant youth-led organization in the nation, a powerful network made up of over 800,000 members, over 100 local groups and a reach of over 5 million per month. UWD’s vision is to build a multi-racial, multi-ethnic movement of young people who organize and advocate at the local and national levels for the dignity and justice of immigrants and communities of color in the United States.