The Truth About ICE and CBP

A Comprehensive Analysis of the Devastating Human Impact of the Deportation Force By The Immigrant Youth & Families Who Know It Best

For Immediate Release
Contact: Sheridan Aguirre | sheridan@unitedwedream.org | 202.793.2267


Dany Vargas
and Manuel Zhinin
and Miguel Reyes
and Elvia Mendez
and Daniel Ramirez Medina
and Claudia Gomez
and Jakelin Caal

These are the names of only a handful of the immigrant youth, mothers, fathers and children who have been targeted by deportation agents and held in detention camps in the last two years. Let’s not mince words: Trump is hellbent on deporting each and every one of us and wants more dollars and more power for the deportation force in order to accomplish his plans.

But we’re fighting back — and we’re telling Congress to defund now! United We Dream is proud to announce the release of The Truth About ICE & CBP, the most comprehensive report of its kind, telling the story of the human impact and uncontrolled growth and power of the nation’s deportation force under Trump, while also providing the policy rationale for Congress to dismantle ICE and CBP and enact legislation to turn their targets into citizens.

Created by immigrant youth, it includes data tracking from our MigraWatch hotline that show the patterns and practices of deportation agents and an analyses of hundreds of first hand accounts. The report also includes concrete policy recommendations for Congress, federal agencies, local governments, advocates and even the next President of the United States.

Learn the truth. Fight back. Defund. Defend.

Click here for the report.

‘The truth will set you free — but first it’ll piss you off.’

Between 2003 to 2018, ICE spending grew by 85 percent, from $3.3 billion to $7.4 billion. ICE chronically misleads appropriators; engages in fiscal mismanagement; and ignores attempts at congressional oversight. In their annual budget requests, ICE falsely claims additional needs alleging rising immigrant populations in their custody.

Similarly, funding for CBP experienced dramatic growth, from $5.9 billion in 2003 to $16.3 billion in 2018, with the number of border agents doubling from FY 2003 to FY 2016. The colossal rise of funding for CBP steadily transformed southern border communities into a heavily militarized southern border.

Besides artificially inflating operational needs, ICE routinely functions as an agency exempt from congressional oversight; and operates as though taxpayers wrote the agency a blank check. ICE routinely overspends its budget for enforcement and detention, then pleads with Congress to financially bail out the agency.

...and Manuel Arpi
and Edder Rizo
and Jorge Sarango
and Cristobal Paute
and Eduardo Samaniego
and Roxsana Hernandez
and She’yaa Bin Abraham-Joseph
and...

This week in Washington, D.C., Jefferson Arpi shared the story of his father Manuel Armando Arpi who has been locked up in a detention camp in Alabama since November 2017.

###

United We Dream is the largest immigrant youth-led organization in the nation, a powerful network made up of over 400,000 members and 48 affiliate organizations across 26 states. UWD’s vision is to build a multi-racial, multi-ethnic movement of young people who organize and advocate at the local and national levels for the dignity and justice of immigrants and communities of color in the United States.

 

The Truth About ICE and CBP

 

The Truth About ICE and CBP:


A Comprehensive Analysis of the Devastating Human Impact of the Deportation Force By The Immigrant Youth & Families Who Know It Best


Explore the Report ⇩
Image
 

The Truth About ICE and CBP:


A Comprehensive Analysis of the Devastating Human Impact of the Deportation Force By The Immigrant Youth & Families Who Know It Best


Explore the Report ⇩
Image

What Happens After ICE and CBP are Dismantled


Image
Image
Image

The Stories of those affected by Trump's Deportation Force


Chapter 1


Deeply Flawed: A Primer on our Nation's Immigration System


Snapshot of Our Nation's Immigration System


Immigrants without status make-up our nation’s undocumented population: a stable, ever-present, vital community of approximately 11 million people who entered without status or subsequently lost their status.


Explore Chapter 1 ⇩

1. Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA)


DACA is a form of prosecutorial discretion that provides a two-year, renewable grant of employment authorization (commonly known as a “work permit”) and protection from deportation for immigrant youth who entered the United States before the age of 16 and meet a variety of stringent educational and background criteria.


2. Temporary Protected Status (TPS)


TPS is an immigration status established by Congress in 1990 that allows DHS to provide between six to 18-months of employment authorization and suspend the deportation of immigrants who cannot be safely returned to their home countries due to dangerous conditions, such as armed conflict, natural disasters, or other extraordinary circumstances.


3. Unaccompanied Children


Beginning in 2014, the endemic violence and growing gang persecution in El Salvador, Honduras, and Guatemala—the Northern Triangle countries—forced a growing number of unaccompanied children to flee their home countries and seek asylum and safety in nearby countries, including the United States. In 2018, a growing number of “so-called” unaccompanied children arose—those separated from their families under the Trump administration’s “zero-tolerance” policy of family separation.


Continue Exploring ⇩

Role of Federal and State Governments in Immigration


Image

Executive Branch

The United States Constitution charges the Executive Branch of the federal government with enforcement of our nation’s immigration laws.

Image

Legislative Branch

The Legislative Branch shapes the immigration system in three key ways: appropriating funds, enacting laws, and exercising oversight.

Image

Judicial Branch

The Judiciary represents one of the last bastions of accountability for the Trump administration’s excessive enforcement policies.

Intersection Between State and Local Governments and Immigration


“Did you know: ICE has agreements with 78 local law enforcement agencies in close to half of all states, granting the authority to enforce immigration law to 1,514 officers.“


Continue Exploring ⇩

A Primer on Deportation: How the Government Deports Migrants


Image

Chapter 2


Built on a Rotting Foundation: A Historical Perspective of Immigration Enforcement


ICE and CBP’s history show that they were build on racist and anti-immigrant notions.


Explore Chapter 2 ⇩
Image

ICE’s policies of arresting and detaining immigrants rests on historical racism and xenophobia. The forced migration and treatment of enslaved people from Africa, combined with years of exclusion of AAPI communities, Latinos, and other immigrants of color, serves as the foundation for our nation’s immigration policies and ICE’s implementation of those policies.

Image

Post September 11th, CBP’s mission was ostensibly to fight the “War on Terror,” and serve as law enforcement along the country’s borders. However, CBP’s enforcement tactics regularly result in discriminatory targeting and egregious human rights violations. CBP officers regularly engage in racial profiling; racially motivated interrogations and arrests; and evade accountability.

Chapter 3


Congress’s Funding Fuel the Cancerous Growth of ICE and CBP


Year after year, Congress has continued to lavishly grow ICE and CBP’s budgets.


Explore Chapter 3 ⇩
Image

Between 2003 to 2018, ICE spending grew by 85 percent, from $3.3 billion to $7.4 billion. ICE chronically misleads appropriators; engages in fiscal mismanagement; and ignores attempts at congressional oversight. In their annual budget requests, ICE falsely claims additional needs alleging rising immigrant populations in their custody.

Similarly, funding for CBP experienced dramatic growth, from $5.9 billion in 2003 to $16.3 billion in 2018, with the number of border agents doubling from FY 2003 to FY 2016. The colossal rise of funding for CBP steadily transformed southern border communities into a heavily militarized southern border.

Besides artificially inflating operational needs, ICE routinely functions as an agency exempt from congressional oversight; and operates as though taxpayers wrote the agency a blank check. ICE routinely overspends its budget for enforcement and detention, then pleads with Congress to financially bail out the agency.

Chapter 4


The Engines of Our Nation’s Deportation System


The Trump administration has unleashed ICE and CBP to terrorize communities at local, state, and federal levels.


Explore Chapter 4 ⇩

Abusive Agency – U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement


ICE is responsible for the arrest, detention, and deportation of individuals within the interior of the United States. Practically, this means that ICE’s enforcement activities often target immigrants with long-term residency in the country; deep ties to their communities; and mixed-status families.


Image

Enforcement “Priorities” that Prioritize Everyone = Mass Deportation

Image

Targeting Community Members at Immigration Check-ins

Image

Targeting Current and Former DACA Recipients

Image

Terrorizing Communities through Immigration Raids

The “Green Monster” – U.S. Customs and Border Protection


In January 2017, as part of its expansion of our nation’s enforcement regime, Donald Trump signed an Executive Order, which directed CBP to drastically expand its enforcement activities and further militarize our nation’s southern border. The administration is in the process of writing another ignominious chapter to CBP’s history of exclusion and discrimination; facilitating the spread of corruption through an inherently lawless agency; and fostering a culture of fear infecting border communities.


Image

Continued Militarization of Border Communities

Image

Licensed to Kill by the Federal Government

Image

Gutting Due Process and Deporting Immigrants Outside of Immigration Court

Image

Persecuting the Persecuted and Separating Families

Chapter 5


Impact on Immigrant Youth, their Families, and Communities of Color


Immigrant youth and their families are fighting back against the administration's deportation machinery through organizing and the use of technology.


Explore Chapter 5 ⇩

#HeretoStay: Immigrant Youth Fight Back


Image

Though this administration fostered fear and anxiety in immigrant communities, immigrants and immigrant youth consistently demonstrated the will to fight back. Nearly two-thirds of DACA recipients participated in a local, state, or national campaign to defend DACA in the last year. During the same period, over a third of DACA recipients participated in campaigns to stop the deportation of a community member and over 35 percent had engaged in a political rally or contacted a Member of Congress. DACA recipients did not limit their activism to immigration, with immigrant youth supporting the fight against this nation’s racist law enforcement targeting of the Black community. Over a fourth reported participating in campaigns to protest the murder of Black men and women.


DACA has empowered immigrant youth to effectuate and believe in change for their communities, with half of DACA recipients reporting a greater participation in the political process since obtaining DACA. Similarly, a majority of DACA recipients report that they have become much more active in their communities after their grant of DACA.


Continue Exploring ⇩

A Growing Resistance Movement Fueled by Community and Technology



Image

Through MigraWatch, community members cooperated with United We Dream to mobilize communities; track trends; and push back against ICE and CBP. Using MigraWatch, community members can call to report immigration enforcement activity such as raids.

MigraWatch Hotline at 844-363-1423


Image

Through United We Dream’s Notifica app, community members have the power to quickly connect with their family, friends, and lawyers, and alert them of issues or emergencies stemming from interactions with local law enforcement or immigration authorities.

Text Notifica to 877877 to Download

Recommendations


Congress, the Executive, state and local jurisdictions, and partners all have opportunities to support immigrant youth and their families.


Image
Image
Image
Image
Image