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For Immediate Release

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UWD Staff

N.Y. Judge Denies Protections for 80,000 DACA-Eligible Young People

The only way to permanently protect all immigrant youth from detention and deportation is a path to citizenship.
Contact: press@unitedwedream.org

Brooklyn, New York – Yesterday, Judge Nicholas Garaufis in New York refused a plea by first-time Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program applicants to order United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) to resume processing pending initial DACA applications. 

Over 80,000 first-time DACA applicants have remained in limbo after a federal judge in Texas ruled to “vacate” the DACA program on July 16, 2021, granting a stay which left renewals open while the case makes its way through higher courts.  Judge Andrew Hanen’s ruling went into effect immediately leaving young immigrants at risk of detention and deportation. 

Juliana Macedo do Nascimento, Deputy Director of Federal Advocacy of United We Dream, said:

“The Biden Administration and Judge Garaufis’ decision to leave tens of thousands of immigrant youth at risk of detention and deportation is wrong. This decision serves as surmounting proof that temporary protections are not enough. Congress must pass permanent protections for immigrant youth, our families and communities now! 

With each deliberate and cruel Republican-led attack against DACA, immigrant youth and their families have felt fear and uncertainty for their safety and their futures. Judge Hanen’s ruling last year is a constant reminder that temporary protections will always leave people vulnerable to detention, deportation, and family separation. As the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals approaches its decision on their DACA case, President Biden and his administration need to be bold and proactive in protecting  immigrant young people, instead of waiting for court decisions.. They must take the lead by preserving and fortifying DACA as promised.”

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United We Dream is the largest immigrant youth-led organization in the nation, a powerful network made up of over 800,000 members, over 100 local groups and a reach of over 5 million per month. UWD’s vision is to build a multi-racial, multi-ethnic movement of young people who organize and advocate at the local and national levels for the dignity and justice of immigrants and communities of color in the United States.